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-span.org. >> john brennan unveiled unused counterterrorism strategy and pakistan -- on velde a and new counter-terrorism strategy on pakistan -- unveiled a new counterterrorism strategy for pakistan. this is about one hour, 50 minutes. >> have never heard it so quiet. that is a sense of our anticipation and excitement about our program today. we welcome you. many on and guests, dear student, faculty, others, we are pleased and honored to host john brennan, the assistant to the president for homeland security and terrorism -- counter- terrorism. it introduced are speaker, we have the perfect person right here in our community. prof. john mclaughlin is a member of our faculty, holding the position of distinguish practitioner at the philip merrill center for strategic studies. as many of you know, john had a highly distinguished career as a central event -- at the central intelligence agency. beginning in 1972 car racing to the rank of deputy director, acting director in two dozen for. no one could have a keener appreciation of the challenges facing our speaker every day. professor, prepared -- t
in pakistan right now. i'm wolf blitzer, you're in "the situation room." first, a powerful reminder today, if they don't reach an agreement in the next 11 days, all hell could brea look. standard & poor's is warning the nation could be shoved back into recession very soon after the august 2i deadline passes with the clock ticking and stakes rising, our own jessica yellin learned that leaders plan to meet this hour at the white house. we're learning a good deal more about where the talks stand. kate bolduan has the latest. what do you know? >> both sides, all sides are cautioning and stressing that there is no deal. we are learning that president obama and house speaker john boehner are making a fresh drive to strive for one maybe last effort on this some of the ideas could include $3 trillion in debt reduction. that could include spending cuts of possibly a trillion or more, entitlement reform that could possibly include changing the age eligibility for -- of medicare, and also on the issue of revenues, there's discuss of whether the bush era tax cuts for higher income earners should expi
. the fact is we went into a country to fight al qaeda who was all in the mountains in pakistan and even in the cities in pakistan, probably with the knowledge of the pakistani government. and we've wasted a lot of money and lives in an area where we didn't need to be, because that war will continue. there are only 100 al qaeda give or take left in afghanistan. but there are al qaeda in other spots in the middle east. and al qaeda's people have plotted terrorist activities from germany and from other places in europe. they don't need osama bin laden's base to have activity. there's nothing you need -- as far as the soviet union, the soviet union went down for goodly reasons, because of all the money they spent in afghanistan. true, we were there fighting them, but their attempt at gaining empire, which has been the loss of many empires, stretching too far and going beyond their supply lines, killed them. they spent money there and they'd like us to stay there. they're being real nice to us. they're helping us with bases, to bring in armaments and troops and supplies. come on, america. sp
a mounting pakistan problem? new citracal slow release... continuously releases calcium plus d for the efficient absorption my body needs. citracal. >>> turning to the middle east. with thousands of protesters once again crowding into the center of the cairo called the friday of determination. silt a scene reminiscent of the early stages of what became and up rooizing that oustest former egyptian president hosni mubarak in february and once again, protesters are calling for justice. vendors have returned to tahrir square for what is now a peaceful show of force. nbc news foreign correspondent richard engle joins us now from cairo. when mubarak stepped down, they promised change, so why have the protesters returned to the square? >> well, the protesters are back out, and they are still in the square right now, ezra, because they don't feel that they have seen the change. there have been a lot of promises, but still, president mubarak has not been put on trial. most of the top security officials have not been forced to resign or been sent to prison as the protesters would like to
and military strategy in afghanistan and pakistan. if confirmed, general dempsey, who currently serves as army chief of staff, will succeed admiral mike mahlon who will retire a the end of september. a democrat carl levin chairs the senate armed services committee. >> good morning everybody. the committee meets this morning to consider the nomination ofmo general martin dempsey to bethii chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. it was not long ago that general dempsey came before us for his nomination hearing to become ago chief of staff of the army. we welcome him back. thanks again for his 36 years o dedicated service to the nation and his willingness to serve asm the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. as we know from those decades of service, general dempsey is an exceptionally well qualified american soldier and leader.al we we were reminded of the last hearing, hell is also a proud we we husband, father and grandfathero huand,l dempsey, will you remain grateful for the sacrifices that you and your family have made over the years, for the devotion of your beloved wife and the military se
in the tribal regions of yemen, but in the foxtrot and pakistan and also in parts of north africa. and in somalia. ultimately, the nctc's mission is to stop another terrorist attack and if i may just say that the leadership of mike leiter and an acting capacity of andrew lieb and i think nctc has played a vital role but it is a team approach and we face a challenging at times as we ever have. >> are you confident that we have the ability to get no work across the agencies as you obviously to coordinate and integrate all of that analyses? do you think we have got it? >> i think we have made a lot of progress. i do think as this committee and this report on the abdulmutallab attack of december 25, 2008 demonstrated, -- or 2009 that we have, we still face challenges and particularly i reviewed the vice chairman's and senator burmex's separate opinion which was quite critical and appropriate so i think it certainly of nctc. senator if i may say, think the greatest challenge facing nctc is the greatest strength that it brings together analysts, planners and other professionals to bring
want to make prior to making any real conclusions, probably is there a connection to pakistan unofficial or otherwise. is this the first attack that we're going to see and the only attack we're going to see? are there going to be more attacks in mumbai or other placesment third and probably most important, how does this affect pakistani-indian relations. that has been a border and boiling point for decades, the indiana yeah and pakistani relations. we are talking to the pakistanis saying, your biggest problem is not india, it's in pakistan and the taliban and terrorist attacks about you. the pakistanis always say, no, no it's india. who you worry about, jon, whoever's fault this is, this will increase tension between india and pakistan and those are two countries who have nuclear weapons. jon: we are looking from the state ride indian television. they are reporting eight people killed. that's what our viewers are seeing on the screen. this comes on the heels of the assassination of president karzai's brother in afghanistan. any likely correction there? >> reporter: not clear.
pakistan's failure to act against militant extremists like the network in the north, the afghan taliban and other militant extremists. we will be interested in hearing general dempsey's thoughts on how to get the pakistan military to go after terrorist groups finding sanctuary in pakistan's tribal regions. al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen and al qaeda elements in somalia continue to take advantage of failing and failed states to train their operatives and to plan attacks against the united states and our interests. it is critical that we don't apply significant pressure to these terrorist organizations, and to work with governments and international organizations in the region to address the long term problems. iran remains probably the greatest risk to world peace and to regional stability. we share the concerns of many nations about iran's continued support of terrorist activities beyond its borders, development of its missile programs, and refusal to cooperate with the international atomic energy commission. while we've seen evidence that the international sanctions has pu
and associated groups outside of afghanistan, pakistan and iraq. director leon panetta expressed concerns on the shifting to other places most notably in yemen, somalia, north africa, and i hope he will address what you see as the appropriate role for the special operation forces in those areas. in announcing lieutenant general allan's nomination, president obama called him, quote, the flight commander to take over the vital mission in afghanistan. if confirmed, the general will have big boots to fill and succeeding general petraeus commander of the 49 member international security assistance force coalition and u.s. forces afghanistan. like general petraeus, general allen brings an in-depth understanding of the complexities of the counterinsurgency effort based on his own experience as the commander in anbar province in iraq. working with the sunni awakening the marines and anbar succeeded in getting local sunni tribal leaders to reject the insurgency and instead support the iraqi government and its the deputy commander at u.s. central command general ellen has developed a regional persp
against al qaeda and associated groups outside of afghanistan, pakistan and iraq. director leon panetta expressed concerns on the shifting to other places most notably in yemen, somalia, north africa, and i hope he will address what you see as the appropriate role for the special operation forces in those aeas. in announcing lieutenant general allan's nomination, president obama called him, quote, the flight commander to take over the vital mission in afghanistan. if confirmed, the general will have big boots to fill and succeeding general petraeus commander of the 49 member international security assistance force coalition and u.s. forces aghanistan. like general petraeus, general allen brings an in-depth understanding of the complexities of the counterinsurgency effort based on his own experience as the coander in anbar province in iraq. working with the sunni awakening the marines andanbar succeeded in getting local sunni tribal leaders to reject the insurgency and instead support the iraqi government and its the deputy commander at u.s. central command general ellen has developed a
frankly operates a bit like the military in pakistan. it is a state within a state. they have their own economy and they had their own businesses and their revolution as it exists in egypt, the uprising as it exists, whatever you want to call it, has not yet focused on what will be that future role of this pebble in the room. the floor is open. yes. direct your question to somebody. push it up on the side, i think. [inaudible] the question is about yemen. when we talk about the arab spring and the uprising -- i would also like to hear little bit more about georgia. that seemed to be a key in the region. >> margot and david white at you say something about jordan and yemen. why would you start on yemen, the uprising of the yemen that has been going on for about a decade. and it has involved people from south yemen that are not too happy about the union of the two yemen's and the short end of the stick that they got. its minorities in the north near the saudi border that have had a revolution going on for several years and the tribal disputes. so there has been a long-standing conflict. d
pakistan didn't do enough, if much avenue anything to help find usama bin laden and maybe even protected him and this morning relations between that key u.s. ally and partner in the fight against terror, is standing on even shakier ground. a report this morning in the "new york times" says the u.s. could suspend a big chunk of military aid to pakistan. and it is a lot of our money, $800 million, in security assistance. peter doocy live in washington with the details. are we looking to cut off the military of pakistan completely? >> reporter: no, but, as you said, "new york times" is reporting that we might cut $800 million out of the 2-plus billion we give pakistan in security assistance and that is because the administration does not apparently think they are being helpful in catching militant and, probably because pakistan kicked 100 of our army trainers out of the country the last few weeks and it comes very very, shortly after the strain on the u.s. relationship which was exposed following our raid on their soil to kill bin laden and earlier this week the new secretary of defense, pa
much, much harder on the diplomatic front with afghanistan, pakistan, and the rest of the region. >> i think a formal accord would be desirable, i agree entirely. even so, it would probably be a fig leaf rather than an actual settlement to the problem there. if we don't get it or can't get it, that shouldn't stop us from going away. >> one of the things you point out in the piece which i thought was very striking was that there was all this opposition and huge intense opposition in this country to the bombing of cambodia because that was seen as crossing an international border. of course, we do that every week now in our drone attacks in pakistan which is it functionally exactly the same thing? pakistan has become a safe haven just as cambodia was and we follow in hot pursuit as it were. >> anyone who's watched a war movie, when you have a tactical retreat, you leave one guy behind to cover and shoot. the other people go away. that's what you have to do militarily on the ground even as we're pulling out our forces, we should be striking hard and aggressively so the enemy can't follow
laden's compound in pakistan and terror group is now within reach. david is live from kabul, afghanistan. >> reporter: the duly appointed defense secretary arrived here a few hours ago to find out for himself the situation on the ground here. he has brief talks with military officials including david petraeus and then he went straight into a meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai. their discussions included the transition of nato held areas of afghan control starting in july but also the drawdown of u.s. troops over the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's
of pakistan. he also revealed that up to 20 top al qaeda leaders from pakistan, yemen, and somalia were identified from laden's compound and are now on america's target list. topping that list, american-born clericÑi anwar al awlaki, leade of al qaeda in yemen, considered the greatest terrorist threat to the united states, the so-called christmas day bomber, was trained and equipped by al qaeda in yemen. panetta confirmed today that the cia has joined the u.s. military in launching air strikes aimed at taking out the leadership of al qaeda in yemen and warned the u.s. must remain relentless in pursuit of al qaeda. >> i think now is the moment, now is the moment, following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them because i do believe that if we continue this effort that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> reporter: despite the progress, panetta warns that al qaeda still remains a serious threat, and even after his success at the cia in bringing down bin laden, panetta says that al qaeda itself will still be a top priority of his in his new job at the pentagon. lester.
is that al qaeda was traditionally in pakistan. we see franchise operationsrance popping a binyamin. also in somalia. then you have this on run, anyou component. in many respects the threat isnt more complex and more drivers because on september 11 al qaeda was like a fortune 500 company with c-span.org as the ceo. now it's much more like a franchise operation. i know senses that the three areas the u.s. intelligence community is achaean very hard,. number one, the pipeline beforet his death, number two, home runs the purcell's uses that as justification to launch attackse as we get toward the tenthet clo anniversary. will these affiliate's kind of step up to fill a void? so i don't think it is as simpl1 as we pull them troops from one area and bring it into the united states. mak unfortunately, relief facing very tough challenges. percy just outlined three big concerns.riti take us through the translation of what that mightes h mean.n fo what other concerns about places that could be a test of tolerable positions, how do you prepare if quality said, it passively services. >> guest: last
of operations concerns about overreliance and sometimes tenuous surface lines of communication through pakistan for logistic support into afghanistan have fled over the past couple years the establishment of the northern distribution network through central asia. however, these northerners may need to be expanded to allow increased movement into an increasingly out of afghanistan that we are to maintain the quality and timeliness of that support to our afghanistan forces people be interested do hear general fraser's views on that. and again, our deepest thanks to you and your families for all the hue of done will do for the nation in the days ahead. senator mccain. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i woke on general odierno, admiral winnefeld, fraser a special thanks to their families and congratulate them on their nominations. i particularly want to recognize mr. tony odierno at, a distinguished wounded warrior and his hearer supporting his father. general odierno, i strongly support your rep nomination to the net chief of staff of the army. her critical role in iraq and a note you are one of the ve
of 9/11 is a period of heightened threat. despite counterterrorism pressure against pakistan including the successful strike against osama bin laden the growth remains dangerous and vengeful. at the same time the threat from al qaeda's affiliate's and adherents around the world has increased and presents particular challenges. i am especially concerned about the threat to the united states homeland from al qaeda in the air arabian peninsula, aqap as we cut, as well as terrorist safe havens in somalia and elsewhere. this means, at least to me, that this is a crucial time for our counterterrorism establishment to be at full strength and not to be without the leader. nctc is a linchpin of this establishment. so i treat least the president has moved quickly to nominate mr. olsen, an individual serving in a senior intelligence community position today to take the helm of this organization. let me take just a moment to read the first paragraph from a letter of support from mr. olsen's nomination written by general keith alexander, that richter of the national security agency. this is a quote
. and there is a problem that some governments are hostage to the religious leaders. pakistan is a good example. saudi arabia. >> iran is a much more intense example because we have the religious leaders within the government to have the control but take north africa i think some of the most enlightening kind of intellectual work being done happens in morocco, tune ease -- ton ease ya, algeria and egypt, or will you find it in indonesia or malaysia or in sub sahharan africa. so there is an internal muslim problem that muslims need to address by themselves. it's not going to lp if it is tainted by some european assistce. that's the inside problem but muslims are not paying sufficient attention to that and i doelieve that american muslims can play the role of a talyst. and you know what, when i do my research in india and pakistan, i find people there telling me that you know the way forward is going to be that you people in the west, you muslims living in the west, in north america and europe, you guys might be pave approximating the way. i said really, do you really want us to show you the way, we hav
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
and pakistan over the past year, counterterrorism efforts in yemen must be a central focus of our national security strategy. that said, our -- closely in line with political, economic and developmental challenges as well. those challenges are those that the united states must work to address as part of a holistic approach to this challenge. first of all, just outlined three. three priorities. first, we need a better understanding of the political opposition and prospects for democratic reform. acting president, the vice president in yemen, as only a small power base in the opposition appears fractured between the so-called joint meeting parties, jmp. and other individuals such as the former commander of the first armored division and check out omar, leader of the powerful fellow. over the weekend elements of the opposition asked the formation of a shadow government to the composition and support, i should say though the -- for those the composition and support for the group remains unclear. it is clear however that the transition process will take place sooner or later. the president has
the kill of osama bin laden and seven years of cia drone strikes on al qaeda hideouts in pakistan has significantly weakened that terrorist organization. view is that now al qaeda's offshoot in yep isn't a greater threat than that -- yemen is a greater threat than that on the afghanistan/pakistan border. >>> the committee chairman says more than 40 americans have been recruited by al qaeda- linked terror otherses. >>> otherses -- organizations. >>> house speaker john boehner is delaying a vote on his rescue plan. ktvu's alison burns is live in our washington, d.c. newsroom to explain this vote delay. alison. >> reporter: dave, that's right. speaker boehner is being forced to rewrite his plan because none partisan numbers will not produces the deficit savings that the speaker promised. president obama promised to veto that plan anyway, but this is another setback with just six days to go. we were in several congressional offices yesterday where phone and e-mail systems were overloaded with people weighing in. democrats are railing against republican plans to cut the deficit with no da
-qaida network was angry and frustrated by the cia campaign in the tribal areas of pakistan and achieving the objective to take senior operatives off of the battlefield and keep the group under pressure so it is difficult for operatives to plan, train and raise money. uma, it is no coincidence that we are starting an identical campaign in yemen. yemen is one of the rising threatt hubs and americans are front and center in al-awaki who i describe is leader of al-qaida 2.0. he was overlooked in a key player in the al-qaida network. why was he not taken seriously? >> one of the things i lay out in the book behind the scene was our . what i showed in interviews and phone records. al-awlaki's contact with the hijackers were evidence of a personful relationship. when he return to the pentagon in 2002 as part of the outreach to moderate muslims, it was like a thief returnns to the scene of the crime, he was contacted with three of the five hijackers on flight 577 that went in the building. >>> and one of the things that is interesting, you want people to understand that this is not simply a ques
that as al qaeda leadership in pakistan comes under pressure, that it is not able to be defined as a safe haven in somalia. since the fall of the mass -- the last national government in 1991, somaliland both the autonomous areas of somalia, have been the only areas with effective governance. somali man seeks international recognition while it truly does not. the question of whether the united states and international committee for the recognizing somaliland or support it integration into greater somalia at some future point requires ongoing an examination and discussion. consequently, today's hearing offers a viable opportunity to examine u.s. policy on a variety of issues involving somali. now i return to ranking member, mr. payne, for comments he might have. >> thank you very much. i would like to thank you and mr. royce for calling this very important joint hearing on assessing the consequences of the failed state of somalia. and it's a pleasure to see my good friend, mr. royce, acting chair the african subcommittee at some point in the past and has maintained a strong interest as has
of the key leadership within al-qaeda, both in pakistan as well as in yemen. >> panetta is also meeting with american troops. president obama wants to bring about 10,000 service members back home this year, and 20,000 next year. >>> a strong earthquake in japan prompted a brief tsunami warning today. a magnitude 7.3 quake shook the northeast coast, the same area devastated by the march earthquake and tsunami. residents received orders to evacuate this morning, but the tsunami order was lifted after several hours. >>> house speaker john boehner is abandoning plans to pursue a massive $4 trillion deficit reduction package. speaker boehner says a smaller agreement is more realistic. >> both men agree, it's going to hurt. but where to find that money? that's where the two camps divide. republicans don't want tax increases. democrats want to keep entitlements like medicare, and social security in tact. so far, no one is budging. the two sides will meet in the white house again sunday inside. >> we agree on some of the big thingsment we agree after a decade of racking up deficits and debt, we
and defended as to how prudently weaver held in pakistan. the're building it to floods in the valley. we put in billions of dollars. they have objective measurements should the favorability is in the single digits. that is pretty disgusting when you're spending that kind of money trying to help people. i understand there's no objective standard in yemen. it to be impossible to measure it on an objective basis. maybe from into total testimony can you give me your description? >> thank you. in general, the experience is that the perception of american aid is positive. the way that i can help illustrate sex most poignantly is that we brand our assistance in most cases the route the country. it is clear. it is clear hewitt is coming from. this is important in terms of the messaging. it also means we're able to operate on our partners openly by the american people. this is well-received. it is done safely throughout the country. >> what would be your gut feeling if they did some standard. what percentage of people do you think would respond that they were favorable tax >> i really cannot speculat
in afghanistan, pakistan, yemen. and i urge this subcommittee to let somalia to guide your policy on somalia rather than any other country. >> i echo my colleagues sentiments. to answer your question, i think we need to look at not only the threat that emanates from there, which does affect our way of life, the freedoms that we enjoy, commerce, threats to navigation, the very real threat irrespective of how are when they got there, the fact that al shabaab has been possible to other terrorist movements and extremist groups allowing them to operate in somalia creating a hodgepodge of characters gathered there, introducing them to reach other, including introducing them to the 30 americans with european and australian passports that of now gone through. for all of those reasons, we need to be concerned. we need to be concerned because we take for granted the areas in somalia and it is not the chaos that we imagine, but south central areas mainly where the conflict is. as the ambassador said earlier, it has been one of the most democratic states in the region. they have its problems, some of wh
. >> the job is most certainly not done. al qaeda operatives still plan across the border in pakistan. the taliban still try to regain lost ground. still intimidate and still assassinate. >> these attacks on karzai's inner circle are, we're told, likely to get worse as u.s. troops again coming home and through the transition in 2014, shepard. >> shepard: jennifer, thank you. there is word of enough signs two al qaeda groups may be joining forces. u.s. officials are now saying the branch in yemen has given weapons, fighters, beings explosives and training to the affiliate in somalia. yes, ma'am mental and somalia coming together against us. the officials say this is especially dangerous because both groups have recruited u.s. citizens. remember that radical american cleric anwar al awlaki is the leader of al qaeda in yemen. the feds have linked him to recent terror plots against the united states. including the attempted christmas day underwear bombing, the food massacre and botched times square bombing. catherine herridge works intelligence for us live from d.c. tonight. catherine, de
. we had the times square bomber inspired by them and had trained with the taliban in pakistan. yes, there are broader links but there are a few things at work here. number 1 a crippling political correctness, absolutely crippling. i think another thing, quite frankly, is that it's very difficult -- say that islam is not a religion of peace. say shari'a is a threat, that's a very difficult thing to come to grips with because that means you're at good with a good slice of the muslim population who does follow muslim fundamentally. who does follow shari'a to the t. that's a scary thing to admit for our government. >> host: and i want to go back to that because no less a person than george bush right after 9/11 said islam is a religion of peace. right after the young comes vo radical muslim walked into the airport in frankfurt and shot a couple of american soldiers, barack obama said one of the islam is one of the world's great religions. my sense we want to believe that because we are a tolerant people. but you've got quotes in this book from several known terrorists and conspirators
interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it is our responseability to determine whether we should be a party to libya's civil war. as a part of this process we will consider the terms and scope of the joint resolution before us today. i'm concerned this resolution would provide broad authorities, permitting significant expansion of the united states military involvement in libya's civil war. the resolution would authorize the president to reescalate united states military involvement in libya, to and potentially beyond the lead role it played at the beginning of the operation when the united states carried out intensive airstrikes on a daily basis. the resolution would on
to go to for jihadists and afghanistan, iran, excuse me, afghanistan, iraq, pakistan or yemen but as many as two dozen muslim americans and al-shabaab with many cases trained by al qaeda leaders remain unaccounted for. the committee has found that all chabad related federal prosecutions for funding, recruiting and attempting to join al-shabaab are the largest number and most significant upward trend in the terror cases filed for the justice department over the past two years. least 38 cases have been unsealed since 2009. minnesota, ohio, california, new jersey, new york, illinois, alabama, virginia and texas three al-shabaab is recruiting inside american mosques and disalle communities like minneapolis and san diego. according to the justice department. this month and also of recruiter pleaded guilty to a recording a large group of muslims from minneapolis at mosques and without any known protest moscow's leaders. a top also leader in somalia supervised this recruiting. one minnesota recruited was a suicide bomber whose 2008 attack on northern somalia send shock waves of alarm
. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport security but the overall system, of course, is only as good as the weakest link, gregg. gregg: the senator said this issue is more now. what has changed in that regard? >> >> reporter: let's take the example of the underwear bomber, it's a good example of a foreign national, in this case a nigerian, who came through yemen and on to amsterdam before he boarded a flight on christmas day in 2009, the american cleric, anwar al-awlaki, the first american on the kill or capture list was the first man there, abdulmutallab, and the bomb maker. >> the threat is far more diverge than it was -- diverse than it was a decade ago. now
afghanistan, pakistan. you're reading a couple pieces in the "new york times." now it's spreading to all of these different countries and one that really jumped off the page for me, drone attacks in somalia. >> joining us, jeremy scahill, on the cia secret sites in somalia, jeremy, the secret training programs and secret prisons out of somalia is part of your reporting there. how big a threat are these terrorist group there's? >> we should say first of all president obama campaigned on a promise to go up against these bush era policies declaring war on the world, running secret sites, torturing prisoners. deeply involved in an underground dungeon officially run by the somali national security agency, but their salaries are paid by the cia directly. in fact, one somali agent described thousand hairli ed ho and paid by u.s. agents and the u.s. is interrogating prisoners, including those rendered by the kenyan government, snatched off the streets in nairobi based on u.s. intelligence and taken to this secret prison and interrogated. it goes against the president's ordered he signed in janua
and talked about, we're not worried about the al qaeda in pakistan because of the death of bin laden though we can't write off ayman al-zawahiri, the new leader of al qaeda in the pakistani tribal areas but he's worried about yemen and al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and also, somalia, across the waterways there where you have al-shabab. so, al qaeda has been morphing for quite some time, since 9/11 and i think he's saying the threats are moving in that direction and that he thinks and the administration believes that al qaeda, the one we think of from 9/11 purposes, usama bin laden and ayman al-zawahiri, may be on its death bed. alisyn: and how, in this new 2.0 version, how much of a threat is anwar al-awlaki. >> he's dangerous, he was here in the u.s. on 9/11 and left the u.s. and went to yemen and, is responsible probably for at least three major attacks or plots in the u.s., including the detroit under wear bombing. including the fort hood assaults, attacks and the ink cartridge capers, where they tried to modify ink printer cartridges as bombs and is considered probably the most dang
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